Cooking Steak on a Himalayan Salt Block

Tonight I will be cooking steak on a Himalayan Salt Block. Seriously, since I discovered cooking on a salt block, I rarely do it any other way. In the summer months I use it on the grill but tonight, I will be doing it in my kitchen as it’s winter here. I will be using a lean sirloin cut.

Many prefer a more marbled cut such as a Rib eye. The one thing you need to keep in mind here is if your steak cut has little to no fat, you will want to use some oil in your marinade. Not so much with a more fatty cut. You see the fat or the oil acts as a barrier and prevents your meat from soaking up too much of the salty flavor. This is one of the five things you must know about cooking on a Himalayan Salt Block

Steak Marinating Recipe for Salt Block Cooking

1/4 cup olive oil

1/2 cup low sodium soy sauce

1tbs brown sugar

garlic salt

pepper

Remove, put on a plate and serve. Note, a London Broil works beautifully on a Himalayan Salt Block. Cooking steak on a Himalayan Salt Block is really easy and has more flavor that just cooking in the oven or stove top.

I buy all my salt blocks at the Himalayan Salt Shop here.
Salt Block Cooking: 70 Recipes for Grilling, Chilling, Searing, and Serving on Himalayan Salt BlocksI put this in a ziplock bag with my steaks and marinate them for a couple hours before cooking and leave it out of the refrigerator. For best results, your steak should be room temperature. Of course you can marinate overnight and then take it out and bring to room temp before cooking.

I slowly heat my Himalayan salt block in the oven, starting at about 200 degrees. Rapid heating will cause it to crack. Every 15 minutes or so, I raise the temperature in the oven until my salt block is about 450 degrees. I usually put the salt block on a baking sheet of some sort for ease of moving it out of the oven. These salt blocks are heavy and can be hard to manage. The baking sheet also catches any drippings.

When my salt block is heated, I take it out of the oven and place it on top of the stove. No need to turn the stove burners on because the block will retain heat far longer than it takes to cook the steak. Depending on the thickness of my steak, usually about 1 1/2 inch, I sear both sides for about 2 minutes each. I like mine pretty rare.

If you have some veggies prepped, the salt block will stay hot enough for you to saute these as well and ta da, you have a complete meal cooked on a salt block.

Remove, put on a plate and serve. Note, a London Broil works beautifully on a Himalayan Salt Block. Cooking steak on a Himalayan Salt Block is really easy and has more flavor that just cooking in the oven or stove top.

 

Must Have Tools for cooking on a Himalayan Salt Block

Himalayan Salt Blocks are heavy and cumbersome, not to mention how hot they need to be to cook on.  I found out the hard way that a dish towel or your typical post holder will NOT protect you from the heat.  You should have seen me running from the grill toting that salt block with the nice perfect steaks on it last summer.  I almost dropped it because it was really that hot.

Below are tools to make it easier and in my opinion are must haves if you are going to be cooking on a salt block regularly!

 

 

 Charcoal Companion Salt Block Protective Case Charcoal Companion CC3526 Salt Plate Holder, 12.4 by 8.4 Ekogrips Highest Heat Resistant Silicone Oven Gloves

 




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